How to create new MoSCoW prioritisation statuses in Jira

St Basil's Cathedral, Moscow
Visiting St Basil’s cathedral was a must when I visited Moscow in 1988

A few months ago, my team at work considered using DSDM’s MoSCoW prioritsation technique for our project’s user stories in Jira.

After a little pondering, this morning I worked out how to do this in our cloud-hosted Jira. This short post shows you how.

Continue reading How to create new MoSCoW prioritisation statuses in Jira

The importance of small user stories

Battleship beneath a grey cloudy sky
“Grey and black boat under grey clouds” by Will Esayenko on Unsplash

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about the size of user stories in agile projects. The idea that I’ve been reflecting on is what if teams only worked with small, similarly-sized pieces of work, rather than exponentially larger blocks of work?

In theory, small user stories should be more predictable, should include less risk, less uncertainty and less complexity. They should, therefore, take less time to complete than larger user stories… you would think! Or as Mike Cohn put it in Agile Estimating and Planning (Prentice Hall, 2006), “small stories keep work flowing”.

Continue reading The importance of small user stories

Scrum makes one promise only

Photo by Nagesh Badu on Unsplash

One of my favourite books on agility is The People’s Scrum (Dymaxicon, 2013) by Tobias Mayer.

A lot of books on agility focus on the mechanics of how it all fits together, who needs to be where doing what with whom in order for the machine to work more effectively.

This book is different. It focuses not on the how, but challenges the why. It is open to critically questioning every aspect of agile with the intention of uncovering the core drivers behind agile practices.

Continue reading Scrum makes one promise only

Agile is a toolbox

While it’s true to say we use the Scrum framework here at Vision, that’s not the whole picture. As Bertrand Meyer says in Agile! The Good, The Hype and the Ugly (Springer, 2014), “every agile team in the field makes up its own cocktail of agile practices, rejecting the ones that do not fit” (p.vii).

In terms of project lifecycle and team management practices, we are fully embracing Scrum. But Scrum has little or no opinion about engineering and delivery practices, which we complement largely with XP methodologies. The Scrum model assumes the development team will work with a product backlog but has no guidance on how that will be created—tools from AgilePM, DSDM or even PRINCE2 might be considered to supplement Scrum. (I’ve not been with Vision for long enough to fully understand how this is done here but that will come.)

Since I was introduced to it, I’ve always considered myself a proponent of agility rather than being partisan to any particular flavour or methodology: XP, Lean, Scrum, DSDM, Crystal, etc.

My agile journey

I was first introduced to agile through XP (extreme programming) having picked up a book at the 2008 Scotland on Rails conference in Edinburgh. (Memorably, that was the same day my then-wife learned we were expecting twins!) The keynote speaker spoke eloquently and persuasively about how agile approaches to software development had brought huge benefits to his team. I was hooked. I raced home, read the book from cover to cover and began to implement the ideas in my own team.

Then the university I was working for embraced Lean and I was introduced to its five principles, eight wastes, kaizen, kanban and a host of other useful concepts. I saw first-hand how empowering teams to own and change their processes reduced waste and improved productivity, effectiveness and team morale.

Latterly, it was decided that our team should embrace DSDM Atern. From a project management perspective, DSDM/AgilePM is the most complete. I have a terrific fondness for both its structure and flexibility.

Agile toolbox

Beneath the umbrella term ‘agile’ we have a toolbox of practices. Some have been codified into highly defined systems like AgilePM, DSDM and Scrum, others like XP and Lean feel more like loosely-related methodologies grouped into adaptable frameworks.

Within each there is the freedom to mine other disciplines for best practices: business analysis techniques, MSP, P3O, traditional project management tools, etc.

Just as you wouldn’t chastise a plumber for using a joiner’s hammer, it makes no sense to prevent an agile team from using a technique from another discipline if it does the job.

None of the frameworks cover everything. It makes perfect sense to supplement them with tools from elsewhere. DSDM makes that explicit: “for most organisations, DSDM is all that is needed,” the handbook proclaims, “although some gain value from integrating DSDM with project management methods such as PRINCE2 and PMI, or detailed development techniques, such as extreme programming (XP).”

This is one of the most helpful diagrams I’ve found that demonstrates the relationship between agile methodologies and how they complement one another:

Diagram showing agile method coverage

Diagram credit: Agile Project Management in Easy Steps by John Carroll (2012)

Over the next few weeks, I expect my blog posts to focus on aspects of both Scrum and XP in particular, exploring in more depth some of the tools we have access to in our agile toolbox.


Originally published on my work internal blog.

Shu ha ri—three stages towards agile maturity

“Scrum has its roots in Japanese thought and practice”, Jeff Sutherland, the co-creator of Scrum, tells us in his book Scrum: the art of doing twice the work in half the time (Random House, 2014), p.38.

One of the ideas that Scrum has drawn on is the Japanese martial art concept of shu ha ri (or shuhari) which outlines three stages of learning towards mastery.

Over the last few years, I have found this a really useful model to bear in mind when working with teams as they embrace and grow towards agility.

Continue reading Shu ha ri—three stages towards agile maturity