How to create new MoSCoW prioritisation statuses in Jira

St Basil's Cathedral, Moscow
Visiting St Basil’s cathedral was a must when I visited Moscow in 1988

A few months ago, my team at work considered using DSDM’s MoSCoW prioritsation technique for our project’s user stories in Jira.

After a little pondering, this morning I worked out how to do this in our cloud-hosted Jira. This short post shows you how.

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How we schedule work requests from other projects

Over the last couple of months we’ve had a number of requests from people and projects, somewhat out of the blue, asking for pieces of work to be completed with a deadline within only a couple of days of asking.

We often say no to such requests, which can take people a little by surprise. But it’s usually not a downright no, it’s more of a ‘not yet’. This post goes some way to explaining why this is.

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MoSCoW prioritisation is on effort

No! Not that Moscow. (Photo taken by me on a school trip in 1988)

One misunderstanding that I’ve encountered a lot over the last couple of years in relation to DSDM agile project management is in the area of prioritisation, and in particular how MoSCoW prioritisation works. In this post I hope to make things a little clearer

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Exception reports, or what happens when a project goes off-track

One of the things that we’re taught when learning the DSDM agile project management framework is that, unlike traditional project management approaches where the project manager manages the team on a day-to-day basis, in DSDM the project manager manages by exception.

This post explains what that means.

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DSDM Agile project management cheat sheet

Spreadsheet
Matrix of product phases and products, indicating who is responsible for what.

Just over a year ago I was sitting in a classroom learning about and sitting two exams on DSDM Atern Agile project management.

Something that I wished had been available at the time was some kind of cheat sheet that broke down each of the DSDM phases (pre-project, feasibility, foundations, exploration, engineering, deployment, and post-project), indicated which products (usually documents) belonged to which phase, and who was involved in the creation of each product.

I couldn’t find anything suitable, so I created my own, pulling out all that information from appendix C of the DSDM Agile Project Management Handbook into a RACI matrix.

Over the last year I’ve found this to be a really useful resource. I have it printed out on A3 and stuck on the wall next to my desk; I refer to it a lot.

You’re welcome to use it and adapt it for your own needs: