Eisenhower matrix in personal projects—what does urgent but not important mean?

Something that I’ve been playing around with for the last few months in my to do app of choice, Todoist, is seeing if I find value in using the Eisenhower matrix to help me prioritise tasks.

But I have encountered a stumbling block when I consider this for use in a personal context: what do I with the “Delegate” label (urgent but not important)?

Continue reading Eisenhower matrix in personal projects—what does urgent but not important mean?

Groupy—grouped tabs for any application in Windows

Two Explorer windows (This PC and Downloads) grouped with tabs

Every now and then I discover a Windows utility that really makes my life easier and my tasks more productive. My latest discovery is Stardock Groupy.

Groupy allows Windows users to drag and drop multiple applications and documents together to group them into a tabbed interface for easy access and reference.

Continue reading Groupy—grouped tabs for any application in Windows

Todoist sections are a game-changer in how I organise myself

Sections in Todoist help

For the last five or six years, I’ve been using a combination of Todoist and Trello to manage my various to do lists and projects but since Doist introduced Todoist Foundations last year, I’ve had to revise how I think about how I organise myself.

Continue reading Todoist sections are a game-changer in how I organise myself

Make Time

Make Time: How to focus on what matters every day

Although I now subscribe to the 12 Week Year approach to planning , one of my overall goals for 2020 is to read more.

I’ve got the year off to a good start reading Make Time: How to focus on what matters every day by Jake Knapp and John Zeratsky, the team behind the popular Sprint: How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days.

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The Joy of Work

One of my favourite podcasts is Eat Sleep Work Repeat hosted by Bruce Daisley, the European Vice-President for Twitter. I was delighted when I heard earlier this year that he was publishing a book, The Joy of Work (2019).

The subtitle of this his first book promises a lot: “30 ways to fix your work culture and fall in love with your job again”. The book is arranged into three sections which he claims together create happier work environments:

  • Recharge—ways we can help recharge our own batteries.
  • Sync—suggestions about how to encourage trust.
  • Buzz—ideas, based on research, that can help teams reach a state of ‘buzz’.

Each chapter relatively short, easy to read and is packed with great, up-to-date research and ends with a few practical ideas about how you could implement that idea.

Recharge

The first section offers 12 performance-enhancing actions to make work less awful:

  1. Have a monk-mode morning—silent and distraction free.
  2. Go for a walking meeting—seemingly, it makes you more creative.
  3. Celebrate headphones—they can really help you focus by shutting out the noise around you.
  4. Eliminate hurry sickness—don’t see gaps in your schedule as moments when you are not working, celebrate space—sometimes you have your best idea when you are doing ‘nothing’.
  5. Shorten your work week—stop celebrating overwork, go home on time, break your day into small chunks. Burnout and exhaustion are no good for your creativity.
  6. Overthrow the evil mill owner who lives inside you—don’t be a tyrant, don’t jokingly say ‘half day?’ when someone comes in at 10:00. Don’t give people a hard time about their hours especially when work has some flexibility.
  7. Turn off your notifications.
  8. Go to lunch—it’s better for your mental health.
  9. Define your norms
  10. Have a digital sabbath—for example, don’t email afterhours
  11. Get a good night’s sleep
  12. Focus on one thing at a time