XAMPP Apache won’t start on Windows 10 — a fix

At work yesterday I discovered that the localhost Apache web server on my PC wouldn’t start; it was running XAMPP.

Each time I tried to start Apache from the XAMPP control panel I got these error messages in the console:

08:59:34 [Apache] Attempting to start Apache app…
08:59:35 [Apache] Status change detected: running
08:59:35 [Apache] Status change detected: stopped
08:59:35 [Apache] Error: Apache shutdown unexpectedly.
08:59:35 [Apache] This may be due to a blocked port, missing dependencies,
08:59:35 [Apache] improper privileges, a crash, or a shutdown by another method.
08:59:35 [Apache] Press the Logs button to view error logs and check
08:59:35 [Apache] the Windows Event Viewer for more clues
08:59:35 [Apache] If you need more help, copy and post this
08:59:35 [Apache] entire log window on the forums

Fix

Reinstalling XAMPP didn’t fix the issue. But this did, spotted on the ever-wonderful Stackoverflow:

  1. Press Windows + R to bring up the Windows Run… dialog.
  2. Type services.msc and click OK.
  3. Scroll down the list of services to find World Wide Web Publishing Service.
  4. Right-click it and select Properties.
  5. Change the Startup type to Manual.
  6. Click Stop and wait for the service to stop.
  7. Click OK.
World Wide Web Publishing Service properties dialog
This is the naughty culprit

That fixed it. Now Apache is running, as evidenced by the green light on the XAMPP control panel:

XAMPP Control Panel
Both Apache httpd and MySQL are running

Getting my Logitech F710 wireless gamepad to work with Windows 10 (and 10.1)

Logitech F710 wireless gamepad
Logitech F710 wireless gamepad

UPDATE: I’ve updated this post a little to also include information about getting this to work in Windows 10.1.


Last night I took the plunge and upgraded my desktop PC from Windows 8.1 Pro (64-bit) to Windows 10 Pro (64-bit).

The whole process took less than an hour, and as far as I could see most of my peripherals were still working after the upgrade: laser printer, scanner, webcam.

Of course, the one thing that I forgot to test were my pair of Logitech F710 wireless gamepads, which my three boys use most to play LEGO games. The controllers couldn’t be detected.

I downloaded the latest drivers from the Logitech website, which they claimed were Windows 10-compatible. That didn’t work.

There are instructions below for both Windows 10 and Windows 10.1.

F710 not working Windows 10

Here’s what I did to get them to work; I found the official Logitech forum to be very useful when I originally encountered this issue with Windows 10.

  1. Remove both nano receivers from the PC (I have mine marked 1 and 2, so I know to which gamepad they belong).
  2. Switch the gamepad to D mode.
  3. Insert the nano receiver.
  4. Windows 10 installs drivers for Rumblepad 2.
  5. Remove the nano receiver.
  6. Switch the gamepad to X mode.
  7. Insert the nano receiver.
  8. Windows 10 installs drivers for Wireless Gamepad F710.
  9. Press Windows key + Pause/Break to open System screen.
  10. Click Device Manager.
  11. Locate Wireless Gamepad F710.
  12. Right-click and select “Update Driver Software”.
  13. Click “Browse my computer for driver software”.
  14. Click “Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer”.
  15. Select Xbox 360 Peripherals.
  16. Select Xbox 360 Controller for Windows.
  17. Click Next.
  18. On the Update Driver Warning dialog, click Yes.
  19. Allow the driver to install. You should now see Xbox 360 Controller for Windows listed.
  20. (Optional: if you have more than one controller, keep the working one plugged in but now do the same, starting at step #1, for the other controller.)
Device Manager listing the Xbox 360 Controller for Windows
Device Manager listing the Xbox 360 Controller for Windows

The controller now works perfectly for me in the LEGO games. Obviously, I’ll report back if there are any further issues.

F710 not working on Windows 10.1

I also found this post, “Logitech Wireless Gamepad F710 Not Working with Windows 10“, on Superuser to be useful when trying to get this working on Windows 10.1. Their advice was as follows.

Make sure your controller is turned off and the wireless receiver is plugged-in to your PC before proceeding with the steps below:

  1. Press Windows key+X (or right-click the start menu icon).
  2. Click “Device Manager”.
  3. Find any listings of “Unknown Device” in the list of devices, likely under Human Interface Devices or Other Devices, or devices that have a yellow “!” warning icon on them.
  4. Right-click each unknown device device and select “Scan for hardware changes” and then “Update Driver Software” > “Search Automatically for Updated Driver” options before the next steps, especially if you have more than one “Unknown Device” listed.
  5. Right-click on “Unknown Device” and click “Update Driver Software”.
  6. Click the option “Browse my computer for driver software”.
  7. Click the option “Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer”.
  8. Near the bottom of the list, select the option that looks something like “Xbox 360 Peripherals” and click “Next”.
  9. From the list, select the driver option “Xbox 360 Wireless Receiver for Windows” and click “Next”.
  10. A warning will appear about the possibility of the device or your computer not working properly and likelihood of system instability. Disregard it and click “Yes” in the bottom right corner of the panel.
  11. A message should appear within a few seconds saying that the device has been correctly installed. Click “Ok” and exit out of all device manager windows.
  12. After performing these steps, power on your controller if it is not already powered on.
  13. Then press Win + R to bring up the run dialog and type in joy.cpl and click OK.
  14. This brings up the Game Controllers control panel applet. You can use this to check whether the game controllers have been identified, and if you select the game controller and click “Properties” you can test it: it will demonstrate which joysticks and buttons are being pressed.

Good luck!

Getting a hp LaserJet 1320 dn to print multiple copies on Windows 7

hp 1320 dn
hp LaserJet 1320 dn (Photo sourced from AMDC)

At work I have an hp LaserJet 1320 dn (duplex and networked) plugged into my PC via USB. (It used to be networked and accessible by the whole office but since moving buildings we’ve not figured out how to do this yet.)

 

It’s great for printing out a quick copy of something without needing to send it to our central printing service and then walking to the other end of the corridor, logging into the printer, pulling the appropriate print job, waiting for the machine to warm up… you get the picture.

The problem

BUT until Monday I could only print out one copy of a document at a time. I’m using Windows 7 Professional 64-bit edition.

Which is fine if it’s just for me but I’ve been preparing interview papers for 14 candidates and four interview panel members. That’s 56 copies of application forms before we even get started on our own evaluation paperwork.

Anyway, my reluctance to walk down a corridor and stand in a dark, windowless room drove me to finally try to fix this. Thanks to Google and conscientious and helpful users on hp’s user forums I found the answer.

The answer

The first thing I did was make sure the latest drivers were installed.

Next, I followed these instructions:

  1. Open Start menu (in Windows 7) and select Devices and Printers.
  2. Right-click the hp LaserJet 1320 printer and select Printer properties.
  3. Select the Device Settings tab.
  4. Scroll to the bottom of the dialog window and find the “Installable Options” section.
  5. Now locate the option “Mopier Mode” and set it to “Disabled“.
  6. Click OK.
Printer properties dialog for hp LaserJet 1320 (PCL 5 driver)
Printer properties dialog for hp LaserJet 1320 (PCL 5 driver) with Mopier Mode set to Disabled.

This should resolve the issue.

I hope this helps other users (and possibly also a future me trying to remember how I did it the first time).

Note: some users, I noticed, on the hp forum reported that with their printer (e.g. LaserJet 1200) they had to do the opposite to get this to work. In other words they had to enable mopier mode rather than disable it.

What is mopier mode?

I’d never heard the word “mopier”. Seemingly a mopier is a machine that makes mopies: multiple original prints.

As more information was being created digitally and printers were becoming faster, cheaper and more reliable people started creating multiple original prints (mopiers) rather than printing one original document and then duplicating it on a traditional photocopier (copies).

The mantra appears to be: mopy—don’t copy.

My HP LaserJet P1606dn stopped printing duplex—here’s how I fixed it

HP LaserJet Professional P1606dn
HP LaserJet Professional P1606dn

I have an HP LaserJet Professional P1606dn, which has been great. It prints double-sided (duplex) — that’s the ‘d’ in P1606dn — and it connects to the network — that’s the ‘n’ allowing Jane to print wirelessly from her laptop.

The problem

But today… for some reason my P1606dn stopped printing double-sided. The option was still there in the printer properties—on the Device Settings tab, under Duplex Mode both “Allow Automatic Duplexing” and “Allow Manual Duplexing” were both ticked.

Hmm…

I tried changing various settings but nothing seemed to fix it. I checked if the driver had been updated. I rebooted the PC. Again, no improvement.

How I fixed it

I was actually in the process of trying to downloading the HP Smart Install software when I stumbled upon the answer.

If you have this printer, you’ll know that you can also connect to a configuration screen via the network. All you need is the printer’s IP address. Mine is at 192.168.1.73 on my local area network.

Well, lo and behold, under the Settings tab there is a section called Paper Handling, and the Duplex option was set to Off. Changing it back to On fixed things for me.

HP P1606dn network settings
HP P1606dn network settings

At least, it did for the first document. I then discovered that (again for another mysterious reason) the next document’s paper settings were blank. Setting it to A4 restored the option to print double-sided.

So, in summary:

  • Check settings (Control Panel > Devices and Printers > Right-click the printer and select Printer Properties > Device Settings tab).
  • Connect to the printer settings via the network.
  • Make sure the print dialog shows the correct paper size.

At least, that’s what fixed it for me.

Update

Sunday 24 July 2016

I’ve come across the same issue today, but this time I’m not connected to a network, the printer is connected via USB.

To resolve this — I had a couple of Word documents that would only offer the ability to print duplex (double-sided) manually — I changed the page size to anything and then back to A4 and then made sure the margins were set to normal or wide, as I noticed that the document margins were oddly small.