Beautiful Google Chrome new tab pages with Momentum

Today's new tab background in Google shows a beautiful landscape
Today’s new tab background in Google.

One of my favourite new Google Chrome extensions (plugins) is Momentum.

Momentum replaces the default Chrome ‘new tab’ page with a beautiful image that changes daily, the current time, plus an inspirational quotation, the weather, and an optional to-do list.

I never used to use the shortcuts on the default new tab page, so I find this page much nicer. It’s fun, it’s friendly, it opens really quickly (unlike other new tab replacements that I’ve tried) and it’s inspiring, not just because of the quotation at the foot of the page, but the image giving you a 24 hours glimpse into another beautiful part of the world.

Today’s image is of Geiranger, Norway, © Igor Sukma. For me it is, interestingly my colleagues who are using this extension always see an image unique to them each day, which is neat.

Check out Momentum on the Chrome Web Store.

New website for Pittenweem Properties

Pittenweem Properties: self-catering in the East Neuk of Fife
Pittenweem Properties: self-catering in the East Neuk of Fife

Over the last few months in the evenings and at weekends, I’ve been working on redesigning the Pittenweem Properties website for friends here in Anstruther. The site launched a couple of weeks ago.

Pittenweem Properties offers high-quality self-catered holiday accommodation and property management services in and around Pittenweem. They currently manage properties in Carnbee just outside Anstruther and Pittenweem. But their portfolio is growing and for good reason — the properties they own and manage are to a very high standard and in a beautiful part of Scotland: the East Neuk of Fife.

WP Booking System

The site was quite fun to build.

We used Trello for communication and project planning, WordPress (of course!) as the content management system, and the Divi theme from Elegant Themes which allowed me to very quickly design and build the site. I also changed the built-in projects custom-post-type to properties using the method I blogged about in March: changing the Divi projects custom post type to anything you want.

For the booking calendar we turned to a premium theme: WP Booking System which we found intuitive and offered most of the features we needed:

  • Multiple booking calendars.
  • Submit booking requests via form.
  • Display anywhere (on page or within widgets) using a shortcode.
  • Customisable display features, including splitable legend for check-in and check-out).

If this plugin had also allowed online payments, say via PayPal, then it would have been absolutely perfect but as it is we’ve been really happy with the functionality and usability of this plugin.

There is a free version of the plugin, but it offers only one calendar and has customisation limitations. The premium version costs only US $34 (approx. GBP £21.50).

Next…

While the site is now live there are still a few bits and pieces to do, such as keep an eye on analytics data and try to improve search engine rankings.

Websites are never really finished, are they?

It was a fun project to work on. Time to focus on optimising family finances and admin, and cracking on with writing my book.

Using Akismet on WordPress Multisite

Akismet is a WordPress plugin for dealing with comment spam. It’s pretty good and simple to set up:

  1. Sign up for an Akismet plan (from free for a personal site, to $50 per month for enterprise).
  2. Use the API key generated to activate your plugin.

The API key (like a license key) is in the format abcde1f23456.

And that’s fine if you have only one site, but if you’re running WordPress multisite then you don’t want to have to activate Akismet individually for each sub-site. That’s just tedious.

Wouldn’t it be much better if you could just add the API key once?

Akismet doesn’t offer that option within the user interface on Multisite. Undeterred, I went in search of a way to do it.

How to do it

The wonderful folks over at WPMU DEV have a really useful blog post from July 2013 about how to do this: How to use Akismet on WordPress Multisite with 1 license key.

The good news it’s really simple:

  1. Open wp-config.php in your favourite text editor.
  2. The WPMU DEV article recommends that you add the API code  below the comment /* That's all, stop editing! Happy blogging. */ but I prefer to add it below the define() block for Multisite. But you can add it where you like, really.
  3. Add the following code define('WPCOM_API_KEY','abcde1f23456');
  4. Save wp-config.php and upload it to your site.

Your wp-config.php file will then look something like this:

[php]
/** Multisite */
define(‘WP_ALLOW_MULTISITE’, true );
define(‘MULTISITE’, true);
define(‘SUBDOMAIN_INSTALL’, false);
define(‘DOMAIN_CURRENT_SITE’, ‘www.example.com’);
define(‘PATH_CURRENT_SITE’, ‘/’);
define(‘SITE_ID_CURRENT_SITE’, 1);
define(‘BLOG_ID_CURRENT_SITE’, 1);

/** Define WordPress.com API key for Akismet in WordPress Multisite */
define(‘WPCOM_API_KEY’,’abcde1f23456′);
[/php]

Like many things on this blog I’ve added this here primarily for my own reference, but I hope it helps you too.

The real credit on how to do this, of course, goes to Sarah Gooding from WPMU DEV: thank you.

Happy spam-free blogging!

Migration complete… but where are the images?

Trello board tracking the migration of my websites
Trello board tracking the migration of my websites

For much of the last two weeks I’ve focussed on two things:

  1. Redesign my website (garethjmsaunders.co.uk)
  2. Migrate that site, this blog, my SEC digital calendar site, and the NYCGB alumni website to a new web host (SiteGround).

I’ve managed to complete the project three days early… well, kind of.

WordPress… we have a problem

One unforeseen snag has been to do with the media (images, PDFs, zip files, etc.) on this blog.

I’ve been using WordPress since version 0.7 in 2003. During that time I’ve been uploading image after image, and as WordPress changed the way that it stored images I’ve experimented with different ways of organising it—even simply uploading the images to my server via FTP. I must have tried about four or five different arrangements.

For the most part, though, I’ve been uploading files directly into /wp-content. Occasionally I’d switch on the “organise my uploads into month- and year-based folders” option.

In short the organisation of media on this blog has been a mess, and I’ve always shied away from addressing it because… well, it worked.

When I came to consider migrating this blog from Heart Internet to SiteGround I did think about the media: would it be a problem if I simply transferred everything over as is and sort it out there.

I was a fairly tight schedule (it had to be completed by 20 January so that my Heart Internet hosting account wasn’t renewed) and I reckoned that since it worked fine at Heart Internet then it should work at SiteGround.

I was wrong.

cPanel and the mystery of the 1,998 files

SiteGround uses cPanel. As Wikipedia explains, “cPanel is a Linux-based web hosting control panel that provides a graphical interface and automation tools designed to simplify the process of hosting a web site.”

cPanel uses Pure-FTPd, a free (BSD licence) FTP server which by default shows up to 2,000 files in each folder. I found that out after the event tucked away in the cPanel documentation.

I had 3,688 files plus 10 directories in my /wp-content folder and I couldn’t figure out why it would only display 1,998 files and the previously  visible directories, such as /plugins and /themes had disappeared.

So…

I am manually working my way through the media library. Uploading files into the appropriate /wp-content/uploads/<year>/<month> directories and updating the database to tell WordPress where the files are.

For those files that were uploaded before there was such a good media library I’m using the Add From Server plugin to quickly import media into the WordPress uploads manager.

This is going to take a while, so please bear with me.

Update

Monday 19 January 2015

I’m making good progress already. I’ve fixed 360/700 images in the media library. That’s 51%, just over the halfway mark.

I’m finding it strangely satisfying getting this sorted out. A bit of website gardening.

WordPress 3.0.1 not publishing scheduled posts

Back in May I published a post about WordPress 2.9 not publishing scheduled posts. Recently I did an automatic update to WordPress 3.0.1 … and guess what: scheduled posting has been broken once again.

I’ll try the method I used before, which was to delete all the core WordPress files and upload them again manually, but in the meantime I found this WordPress plugin has done the job: Missed Scheduled.

By default the plugin is set to run every 15 minutes, but I’ve changed mine to 2 minutes by editing line 12:

define('MISSEDSCHEDULED_DELAY', 2); // Number is in minutes, change it according to your needs

If it turns out that uploading the files manually fixes the issue again I guess I’ll be running manual upgrades in future.