Tromsø—interactive, high definition photo

Tromsø in high definition
Tromsø in high definition

We are probably all quite used to the detail that we can see on Google maps these days, particularly in the street view. But check out this interactive, high-definition photograph of Tromsø in Norway. The level of detail that it has captured is astounding!

Circus

Circus and elephants
Circus and elephants

On the zoomed-out map you cannot even see the circus tent, but zoomed in you can clearly see the elephants (and a giant, pink dancing elephant).

Mountains

Mountains above Tromso
Look at the level of detail on the mountains opposite.

This is range of mountains directly across from the camera, at maximum zoom. You can clearly see detail of rocks.

Ships, houses and sunbathing

Ship docked, with woman sunbathing on the balcony
Who is that on the balcony?

You can clearly see someone relaxing in the sun on a balcony on this side of the river.

Ski jump

Ski jumps without snow
I wonder if anyone uses this in the summer for skateboarding

This looks like a ski jump without the snow. It’s on the far side of the photograph, certainly too far away to see on the fully-zoomed-out photo.

Paraglider

Paraglider in a rainbow-coloured parachute
Someone hanging around in Tromsø

Check it out!

The photo is quite amazing, capturing an ordinary day in Tromsø. I have probably spent hours over the last couple of years exploring it, looking for the extraordinary amongst the ordinary: Two folks paragliding. A helicopter. Cyclists crossing the road. Two figures in black suits walking through the cemetery. Elephants.

What do you spot in the photo?

My rubbish photos

myrubbishphotos

Back in the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s I had a succession of cameras. And with them a succession of rubbish photos. Now they are appearing on a dedicated blog near you!

Kodak Instamatic 76X

My first camera I got for one of my birthdays while I was at primary school (I think). It was a small Kodak Instamatic 76X that took 126 film cartridges and used disposable flash cubes.

The flash cube snapped into the top of the camera and as you would expect when you pressed the shutter button it also triggered the flash. As you then manually wound the film on to the next picture, by pulling on a lever with your thumb, it also turned the flash cube round to the next bulb.

Once all four bulbs had been used you had to replace the cube. No wonder our planet is in such a mess!

I don’t remember taking many photographs indoors with that camera.

Or outdoors, for that matter.

In fact, I had an unprocessed film from that camera sitting in a box for years until I had it developed. Disappointingly I can’t remember what was on it. Or where the resulting photographs are.

110 film cartridge

I also can’t remember what make my next camera was (probably another Kodak), but by that time I had advanced to one that took smaller 110 film cartridges and had a built-in, automatic flash that couldn’t be replaced. It also probably ate AA batteries.

I remember taking that one to Greece on a school trip.

Come to think of it, it might have been my Mum’s camera.

35mm

From there I graduated to a pair of Fujifilm automatic 35mm cameras. The first I bought in Singapore on the first National Youth Choir of Great Britain world tour in 1992.

The second I bought at the Argos in Victoria, London after my Singaporean bargain was stolen from a Youth Hostel in York, on another NYCGB course.

One of the things I loved most about those cameras was the automatic loading: drop the 35mm film into the back, close the door and press the button. Whirrrrr whirrrrr whirrrr click and it was loaded.

And lots of rubbish photos

It didn’t matter what kind of film you had, however, one thing remained constant and that was whenever you got close to the end of the film you began to get impatient. The camera could have sat around for months, unused, forgotten. But as soon as you used it for something, and noticed that you had only a few frames left you started to get impatient.

And that’s when I would start taking random photographs around the house. I’d kid myself that I was being arty, and experimental and that they would contribute some day to my overall artistic expression, and some day people would marvel at them.

Back in June 2008 I started a new blog: My Rubbish Photos so you — and people like you — could marvel at my artistic expression.

I’ve only just gotten around to updating it again.

Coming home to Reuben and Joshua

20110823-reubenoncarroof

When I arrived home this evening Reuben wanted ‘up’. Initially ‘up’ into my arms but then ‘up’ onto the car roof. Who was I to deny his wishes?

I think every car needs a Reuben Roof Accessory™. It would certainly prevent you from speeding!

20110823-joshuaphotographer

Fast forward twenty minutes and both Reuben and Joshua were on my desk with a camera each. Thank goodness for digital cameras: I hate to think how many 35mm films we’d have gone through by now!

They love taking photos, and I love taking photos of them taking photos.

I love coming home in the evenings to Reuben, Joshua and Isaac (who was already in bed when we were messing about with the cameras).