The cup goes to the garden

lsupper

On Thursday night at All Saints’, St Andrews we celebrated The Solemn Eucharist of the Lord’s Supper.

This service on Maundy Thursday is the Eucharist of the Eucharist, the Mass of the Mass. We remember the origin of the Eucharist: Jesus’s last supper with his disciples before he retired to the Garden of Olives and was handed over to the Romans by Judas Iscariot.

Maundy Thursday always reminds me of someone I knew during my curacy at St Andrew’s Cathedral, Inverness. His name was Cathal and he was a member of the L’Arche community in Inverness.

Every Sunday after the service Cathal would process solemnly up the aisle to the west door, holding his prayer book above his head as though carrying the gospel, where he would look you in the eye and would say quite sincerely “the cup goes to the garden. The cup goes to the garden.”

“That’s right, Cathal,” I’d say, to reassure him that I’d understood what he was saying, “the cup goes to the garden”.

And it was about this service, the Solemn Eucharist of the Lord’s Supper, to which he was referring. Because after the Eucharist the priest, deacon and sub-deacon take consecrated bread and wine to the “altar of repose” (which is an altar usually in a side chapel decorated with flowers) to remind us of Jesus moving from the Last Supper to the Garden of Olives.

It showed to me how important the liturgy is. It showed me how these dramatic, choreographed parts of the service can speak to people at different levels and to people of different abilities. It showed to me how liturgy is more than just the words, and that by acting something out it can go deeper than just understanding it with the mind.

(It’s taken me three days to finish this blog post… off now to the Easter Vigil where I’m singing the Exsultet, the Easter Proclamation.)

Prepare for Metallurgy

If, like me, you’ve always wondered what a synthesis of METAL and LITURGY forged in the fires of time would sound like, well wonder no more.

The Martyrs (CA) are here to answer the until-now unanswerable. Listen to a couple of tracks at PureVolume or on iTunes.

Crafted in secret to do battle with the forces of evil and imbued with the holy light, METALLURGY is the death knell of the old order, a veritable new age of justice and life. Though the storm rages, though the darkness may threaten, the ancient light is passed on! Prepare for METALLURGY.

Does that actually mean anything? ‘Metallurgy’ is a made-up word, right?

Anyway, the music’s not bad. If you’re into short progressive songs, more-spoken-than-sung lyrics and bits of liturgy thrown in for good measure.

(Song ideas for Powerpoint, Neil?)