Matching Google Chrome’s developer tools theme to your text editor theme

Sublime Text 2
Sublime Text 2

My main coding text editor is the excellent Sublime Text 2, my favourite theme is called Tomorrow-Night by Chris Kempson, and my go-to browser is Google Chrome.

Being involved in web design I use the Chrome web developer tools all the time for debugging JavaScript, identifying HTML classes and tweaking CSS. It looks like this:

Google Chrome developer tools
Google Chrome developer tools

But as you can see from the screenshot above, the default view is rather dull: white background, uninspiring syntax highlighting. It’s a shame that you can’t match the Chrome developer tools code panel with my text editor of choice.

User StyleSheets

Well, it turns out you can! Chrome provides a “User StyleSheets” directory into what you can drop a Custom.css file.

Windows
C:\Users\%username%\AppData\Local\Google\Chrome\User Data\Default\User StyleSheets\
Mac
~/Library/Application Support/Google/Chrome/Default/User StyleSheets/
Ubuntu
~/.config/chromium/Default/User StyleSheets/

A number of people have also done the hard work for us and made available ready-to-use CSS files for various themes. These are my two favourite dark themes:

  • Tomorrow
  • Monokai (UPDATED: This version works better when editing code in the Elements tab.)

Having saved the code to your Custom.css file and saved it, Chrome updates immediately:

Google Chrome developer tools with Tomorrow theme
Google Chrome developer tools with Tomorrow theme

Woohoo! I’ve just installed Ubuntu

I’ve just updated the previous post, but I’ll say it again:

Woohoo! I’ve just successfully installed Ubuntu 6.06 LTS.

Here’s how:

  1. Updated the BIOS to the latest version (08 August 2003)
  2. Ran the Live CD
  3. Used GParted to manually delete the current partitions
  4. Ran the Ubuntu installer
  5. Er…
  6. That’s it!

It’s now installing 186 updates … Woohoo!

Now … what Microsoft software is available for it? I much prefer Microsoft software to any of that homemade stuff. They’re a proper company and everything.

😉

p.s. I’m only teasing. I love Open Source software.

How hard can it be to install Linux?

Ah! see … folks go on and on and on about how lovely and shiny Linux is, and how much better it is than Windows.

So I dug out Jane’s old PC and fired it up with the Live CDs of:

  • Ubuntu 7.10 – didn’t load the Live CD
  • Ubuntu 6.06 – loaded Live CD, but wouldn’t install
  • Kubuntu 7.10 – didn’t load the Live CD
  • Kubuntu 6.06 – loaded Live CD, got bored waiting for install
  • Xubuntu 7.10 – didn’t load the Live CD … and it’s for old, crap PCs!! 😉
  • Ubuntu 5.whatever – installing right now, but won’t recognise the network

Not as easy as these so-called experts make it out to be, ay!

Mind you, it probably doesn’t help that Jane’s old PC is made from twigs and previously ran Windows 98. 😉

Update

00:19 Monday

I really should have added the wink 😉 at the end of the last paragraph — I’ve added it now.

Woohoo! I persevered as Ubuntu 6.06 seemed to get so far before falling over.

So after updating the PC’s BIOS — after much detective work I discovered that the motherboard is a M810L v.7.1a from PCChips — I was able to boot to the Ubuntu Live CD and install from there … once I’d used GParted to manually delete all the partitions on my hard drive.

Thanks for the advice Richard, but I really wanted to check out Ubuntu having used it very successfully before. And I’m not the kind of person who just gives up because something’s not working. That’s how I learn. 🙂