Microsoft Outlook category colours

Here’s something that bugs me every time I have to use Microsoft Outlook: the Categories colour picker:

Categories colours

Seriously, who a) chose those particular colours, and b) put them in that completely random order?!

Would it be too much to ask for a more colour-spectrum order? Something like this:

Category colours in a better order

A first world problem, I know. But it really bugs my sense of aesthetic and order every time I use it. Which is often.

Today, I’ve been working at St Andrews for a decade

University of St Andrews homepage in 2006
The University of St Andrews website that I inherited in 2006

Today is exactly ten years since I started working at the University of St Andrews. I joined the web team within Business Improvements as assistant information architect/web manager. There were two of us in the team. I always said at the time that I liked my job title because with the forward-slash it looked like a URL.

I remember getting offered the post and thinking, “Well, if I don’t know it now I can always learn it on the job.” You read my reflections on the job interview here on my blog.

Ten years on I am now the web architect within the digital communications team (part of Corporate Communications) we have a team of 10, and I work mostly in Agile project management and business analysis. Ten years on, I still love my job, and I love my team. I’m still being challenged, I am still learning how to do my job better, and I still growing.

Obviously, I’m now even more involved in the life of the University having taken up the post as warden at Agnes Blackadder Hall. I will reflect on that in more detail in another post shortly, suffice to say here that I’ve agreed to stay on beyond my probationary period.

But today I’m celebrating ten years here… well, fourteen if you include my four undergraduate years from 1989 to 1993. I wonder where I will be in ten years from now.

The writing’s on the wall

Foam bath letters on the tiled wall.
I like Isaac’s categorisation by colour.

This afternoon after Isaac had been to the loo, like the good boy he is, he dutifully washed his hands.

About 20 minutes later I stood at the top of the stairs and noticed he was still standing at the sink in the downstairs loo. But now he had the plug in and had filled it with warm water and fetched a few of his Octonauts toys.

“Would you like a bath?” I asked.

“Yeah!” he said, quite enthusiastically and moved operations from the downstairs loo to the upstairs family bathroom. Isn’t it just as well we’re an upstairs family.

The bath was run and in jumped a very happy Isaac, two Captain Barnacles, one Lieutenant Kwazii, a GUP-B and a GUP-D, and they were off for a proper adventure. None of this paddling around in a sink nonsense!

About ten minutes later I noticed that the play had stopped and it was quiet in the bathroom, apart from the gentle lapping of water and the sound of Isaac doing… well something. So I went to investigate.

Isaac is taking a real interest in numbers and letters just now. At nursery he now has to literally sign in by writing his own name. So when I poked my head around the bathroom door I was delighted to see that he had tipped out both tubs of foam letters and was arranging them, by colour, on the tiled wall. That’s my boy! We’ll make an information architect out of him!

I can’t quite decide, though, if the two ducks (one has a knight’s helmet on, by the way) are watching what’s going on or being punished and told to look at the wall.

IA decisions in net magazine: why not match up the browser icons?

Since the net magazine rebrand a few months ago the projects section of the magazine, which is printed on a rougher paper to distinguish itself more easily from the glossier feature articles, often includes a handy guide to which browsers a particular technology supports.

The infographic shows desktop browser support on the left, mobile/tablet support on the right. But in the spirit of Steve Krug’s book Don’t me me think, the way it is currently laid out has me thinking too much. I want to know what their design reasoning is.

Here is an example from the current issue (May 2014), from an article on page 84 called “Slash design/build time with proportional RWD”:

List of desktop browser icons, in two columns: desktop on left, mobile on right
Why don’t the icons match up? This just makes me think too hard.

But whenever I see this it always makes me wonder why they have not matched up the icons. What is the order being shown here? It’s really not obvious to me. It’s not alphabetical, it’s not by version number, or popularity.

Why not simply show a comparison between desktop version and its comparable mobile version, and then any left over can be arranged at the bottom?

I often find myself thinking, “Okay, so this feature is supported from Chrome version 6 onwards, but from which version of mobile Chrome is this supported?” And then I have to go hunting for the Chrome icon on the right-hand list.

Why not match the icons up, like this?

...and relax! The top four icons are matched, leaving the unique browsers to fight it out at the bottom
…and relax! The top four icons are matched, leaving the unique browsers to fight it out at the bottom

That makes it much easier for me to read. My five year old Joshua thinks this makes more sense. What do you think?