Firewatch (redux)

Firewatch wallpaper

Five years ago today, Campo Santo released what quickly became my all-time favourite computer game, Firewatch.

If you haven’t already played it and you’re tired of running, jumping, shooting-at-people games, this is a very welcome change.

In a world that has been locked down for almost a year, this game has been a perfect virtual escape for this introvert who loves to explore the world alone.

Continue reading Firewatch (redux)

Everybody’s gone to the rapture

Scene from 'Everybody's gone to the rapture' showing a car in a deserted car park, rays of sunshine through the trees

It looks like The Chinese Room, the games company behind the exquisitely beautiful Dear Esther, is working on a new game entitled ‘Everybody’s gone to the rapture’.

All the website gives away at this stage is:

6th June 1984 06:37am

Time since Primary Event 5 days 4 hours 37 minutes

Time since Omega Event 0 days 0 hours 37 minutes

This story begins with the end of the world.

As well as a few screenshots of the environment, which like its predecessor looks stunning.

One to keep an eye on, methinks.

 

The LEGO® Movie – official teaser trailer

I always loved LEGO® as a kid. I’ve often said that the LEGO Star Wars games pretty much sum up a large portion of my childhood: LEGO, Star Wars and computers.

I love the various LEGO games we have: LEGO Star Wars: The Complete Saga, LEGO Star Wars: The Clone Wars, LEGO The Lord of the Rings, and LEGO Batman 2. I love the handful of other LEGO movies we have (mostly Star Wars)… so this looks great.

I can’t wait. Neither can the children. Erm… that’s what I meant, obviously, Reuben and Joshua are so looking forward to this film. And me too. A bit.

Installing Steam games on a second hard drive

Steam logo

About a month ago I took delivery of a new, much faster PC from PC Specialist. Now I’m getting around to reinstalling games, and I’ve just discovered a neat trick to install Steam-powered games on a second hard drive.

My last PC had served me well for about six years but it was creaking a little around the seams and was being pushed very hard particularly when gaming. It was time to upgrade.

And after upgrades comes the often arduous task of reinstalling applications.

dual-boot or not dual-boot?

On my last two PCs I’ve always set up a dual-boot environment. One partition (C:) was for day-to-day applications (email, web browsing, web development, image editing, etc.), the next (D:) was for games. My reasoning was:

  1. Clean installation of Windows with minimal, and only essential, drivers.
  2. Less distracting. If I wanted to play games then I would need to reboot the PC into the games partition.

However, in practice what it meant was:

  1. Twice as much work, keeping two versions of Windows up-to-date, with both Windows updates and driver upgrades.
  2. It was such a hassle to shut down everything and reboot that I rarely ever played any games. The only people to play were Reuben and Joshua when they played the LEGO Star Wars games.

So I decided on this PC to single-boot (Windows 8 Pro, 64-bit) and install everything side-by-side across two hard drives: my main applications are on C: (120 GB SSD); most of my data plus games are on D: (1 TB Western Digital SATA drive).

So far, so good. I’ve played games more in the last couple of weeks than in the last couple of years, but contrary to my fears it’s not distracted me from my main work on my PC.

However, this evening I realised after installing the Steam client for the first time that it was about to install all 7.8 GB of Call of Duty: Black Ops onto C.

No, no, no, no, no!

Moving Steam to a second hard drive

It turned out to be a pretty easy task to move Steam from C to D. I found the instructions on the Steam support website.

By default Steam installs to C:\Program Files\Steam (or C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam on 64-bit editions of Windows) and the games install to C:\Program Files\Steam\steamapps.

“During the installation of Steam, you have the option to install Steam to a location other than the default. Since Steam relies on the game files residing in the SteamApps folder, your game files will go to whatever folder you have Steam installed in. The game files must be in the SteamApps folder in order to function.”

So, here’s what to do, assuming that you’ve already installed Steam to C:.

  1. Log out and exit Steam.
  2. Navigate to the folder where Steam is installed (by default: C:\Program Files\Steam\; or C:\Program Files (x86)\Steam\ on 64-bit).
  3. Delete all of the files and folders except the SteamApps folder and Steam.exe.
  4. Cut and paste your Steam folder to the new location, for example: D:\Program Files\Steam\.
  5. Launch Steam.
  6. Steam will briefly update and then you will be ready to play.

Conclusion

I’ve just done this and it worked.