A week of much sleeping

Two red Lightning McQueen toy cars under Isaac's pillow.
Two Lightning McQueen toy cars under Isaac’s pillow.

This evening while I was getting Isaac ready for bed, I pulled back his pillow to retrieve his pyjamas and to my astonishment found two toy Lightning McQueen cars.

I know that the tooth fairy leaves money for collecting teeth. What body parts has Isaac been donating that explains why I found two toy cars under his pillow this evening?!

A minute or two later, once Isaac had changed for bed, Joshua came bounding in and revealed that he had been the one to place them there as a surprise. What a little japester!

Sleep

This is probably the right photograph to sum up my week: a bed. I have slept a lot this week. They say that sleep is the great healer, well it seems that’s exactly what my body has needed.

It is now nine weeks since the headache started, and eight since I was admitted to hospital and diagnosed with viral meningitis.

My energy levels are still very low and I’ve been taking my GP’s advice to the letter and pacing myself, going for sleeps during the afternoon when I’ve needed them. I’ve been sleeping anywhere between one hour and three and a half or more.

Over the last couple of weeks the headache seems to be loosening its grip on me. I’ve only had to take painkillers on a couple of occasions during the last seven days. While the headache once raged like an incessant storm inside my head, dulled only by 30/500 co-codamol that also played havoc with my stomach, I now only get visited by the occasional headache ‘thunderstorm’ that rumbles for a few minutes and then dissipates almost as quickly as it arrives.

My eyesight has been continuing to improve, which is a tremendous relief. My left eye is now just about 20/20, my right is not quite there yet. I can’t read yet with my right eye unless the text is very close to my face and I look at the line above the one I’m trying to read and rely on my peripheral vision to see the text.

I saw the ophthalmologist again at Victoria Hospital, Kirkcaldy on Wednesday. She was happy with my progress, and suggested there was no intervention that she could suggest that would sleep up the healing process. Nature seemed to be doing that on its own, so let it. I’ve to return in eight weeks.

I made a decision at the start of August, while I was in a hospital bed, that I should not feel anxious or frustrated about this. I am healing, slowly but surely. I’ll be ready when I am. It’s a strategy that, other than a few days where my optimism has dipped, is working for me.

Other than the occasional visit to hospitals, and a short walk with Reuben and Isaac last Saturday (about 2 miles, followed by a three-and-a-half hour sleep) I’ve been in the house (or garden) for nearly two months now.

I shall be compiling the next issue of Indoor Enthusiasts’ Monthly over the next few days. Subscription fees are now due so please send them in!

Here’s to a continuation of the progress I’ve seen over the last few weeks.

A day in bed

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Photo by Lillian Nelson | stock.xchng

Thank the Lord for grandparents who live only five minutes’ down the road, and who can take all three children at the drop of a hat.

Jane and I spent most of today in bed asleep, fighting some kind of fleeting, flu-like tummy bug. We ached all over: eyes, joints…everywhere! I felt very, very nauseous. I had a bucket beside my bed—it was that serious.

Reuben, Joshua and Isaac were delivered back to the sick-house just before 6pm, as Jane and emerged from our half-day hibernation.

I’m still feeling quite fragile, but a couple of glasses of Coca Cola have really helped with the nausea. I just hope I can sleep tonight, though. Now, that would be ironic.

Christmas 2011

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Above: Isaac gives a knitted Santa a cuddle a few days before Christmas.

Christmas Eve

“I was very surprised that you agreed to preach at the midnight mass,” said Jane on Christmas Eve, “after you’d said last year that you were going to take a year off this year.”

“Did I say that?” I asked.

Apparently so, but I’m glad that I had forgotten because the midnight service at All Saints’, St Andrews was beautiful. The nave (where the congregation sits) was in darkness, lit by hand-held candles, there was a procession during which the baby Jesus was placed in the crib, which was then blessed. The choir was small but enthusiastic; and daring (In dulce jubilo in German). My sermon was warmly received, with another member of the clergy team saying to me afterwards that he thought that it was “spot on”, which I found encouraging.

I drove back to Anstruther around a quarter past one, glowing and thanking God. While I was waiting for the toast to pop-up at home I tweeted:

Fabulous midnight mass at All Saints, St Andrews. The good news of Jesus preached. Feeling very blessed. Happy Christmas one and all. x

I retired to bed for about four-and-a-half hours.

Christmas Day

The drive to Selkirk wasn’t quite as I had planned; particularly the 30 mph winds. I don’t think I’ve ever been so scared while driving. The Forth Road Bridge was closed to high sided vehicles, buses, cars with trailers, caravans, motorcycles, bicycles and pedestrians: pretty much everybody apart from us. I crept across the almost deserted bridge at 30 mph, driving mostly down the line between the lanes.

Just south of Edinburgh, at Newtongrange we discovered that Isaac had a very dodgy tummy. And that we’d forgotten to pack a change of clothes. He turned up to St John’s in Selkirk wearing his pyjamas: a George Pig (Peppa’s brother) fleecy sleep suit. Very sweet.

Jane stayed at my Mum’s to prepare Christmas lunch while the rest of us (minus Reuben, who wanted to stay with Mummy) went to church.

We had Christmas lunch round a wallpaper-pasting table covered in a table cloth, which was a great idea and fit the space perfectly. Jane’s lunch was cooked to perfection—even the parsnips in honey and mustard which always go wrong for us.

Before and after lunch presents were opened, mostly by Reuben and Joshua regardless of whose name was on the label—they were so excited, it was great. And all too soon we were packing up bags and boxes and loading up the car again for the equally-windy drive back to Fife.

Once back home the boys all transferred effortlessly (and for us thankfully) from the car to their beds. We unpacked the car, reheated some Christmas dinner and crashed out in front of the telly to watch the season finalé of Merlin that we’d recorded from the night before.

Then bed.

Boxing Day

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Above: Joshua (left) and Reuben rip open a present on Boxing Day morning.

This was our stay-at-home day, with the majority of Reuben, Joshua and Isaac’s presents still to open. It was nice to stretch out their presents over the last two days rather than overwhelming them with everything all at once.

Jane had picked up a big box of action figures: underwater, mountain, space, etc. which you can see Reuben and Joshua opening in the photograph above. They have loved playing with them all day. At one point they were both lying on top of the dining room table totally engrossed in their play: fabulous!

It was also a tired day, as the busyness of the last few days caught up with us. Jane crashed out on the sofa around mid-day; I went for a sleep mid-afternoon; Reuben fell asleep on the armchair just before dinner.

That said, bedtime still took about three-and-a-half hours. And everybody wanted Mummy to put them to bed.

And to be honest, that’s where I should be now, so I’m going to be uncharacteristically sensible and catch up with as much sleep as I can get. That is, after all, the only thing that I asked for for Christmas: a sleep.

Night, night! And Happy Christmas!

Planning ‘big boy beds’ for Reuben and Joshua

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Rough sketch of how Reuben and Joshua’s room might be laid out with single beds.

This evening (Tuesday) Jane and I sat down to plan buying “big boy beds” for Reuben and Joshua. How can they be that old already?!

The bed rails are now ordered from Amazon and we’re planning a late-in-the-day trip to Ikea this week to pick up a couple of Malm single beds. Then they’ll need new duvets and duvet covers. Fireman Sam, anyone?

It’s all part of a cunning plan to get them used to sleeping in single beds before we go away on holiday next month.