The primary purpose of a development team is…

Before you read further, take a moment and answer the following question for yourself: what is the primary purpose of a development team?

Don’t worry, I’ll wait…

Okay, what was your answer? Is it to create working software? (Well, yes.) Is it to complete everything on the sprint backlog (Hmmm… kinda.) Is it Henry, the mild-mannered janitor? (Could b… No!)

Above all, the primary job of an agile development team is to build quality into the product.

That focus on quality is important because it informs us and shapes us in everything we do as a team, from planning through to delivery.

When I introduced agile to one team with whom I worked, it took me a long time to help them get beyond their misconception that agile meant quickly hack things together and shove it out the door. Release early and release often—yes; dirty hacks—no! Done well, agile should be more disciplined than other traditional methodologies and focus on quality.

The first principle of the agile manifesto reads, “our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.” The agile manifesto values “working software over comprehensive documentation”. Valuable software is working; working software relies on quality.

The fourth principle of DSDM/AgilePM is “never compromise quality”.

What small step could you take now to improve the quality of your work?

Be agile not Agile™

In 2014, Dave Thomas, one of the seventeen who met at Snowbird ski resort in Utah and came up with the Agile Manifesto, wrote a blog post with a wonderfully clickbait title: “Agile is dead (long live agility)”.

In the article he laments that too many people focus on ‘Agile’ with a capital ‘a’ as though it was a brand: Agile™. Agile isn’t a noun (a naming word, my primary school teacher would drill into us), agile is an adjective (a describing word). Thomas urges us to think about agility not Agile.

“The word “agile” has been subverted to the point where it is effectively meaningless, and what passes for an agile community seems to be largely an arena for consultants and vendors to hawk services and products.” — Dave Thomas

Agile principles

I’ve been thinking a lot recently about agile principles. What are the fundamental truths that serve as the foundations of agile development—sorry, of development that shows agility?

Agile manifesto

Of course we have the Agile manifesto:

“We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:

  • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
  • Working software over comprehensive documentation
  • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
  • Responding to change over following a plan

“That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.”

Scrum values and pillars

Scrum has five core values:

  • Commitment
  • Courage
  • Focus
  • Openness
  • Respect

and three pillars

  • Transparency
  • Inspection
  • Adaptation

AgilePM (DSDM) principles

I’m fond, too, of the eight principles on which AgilePM (formerly DSDM Atern) is built:

  1. Focus on business need
  2. Deliver on time
  3. Collaborate
  4. Never compromise quality
  5. Build incrementally from firm foundations
  6. Develop iteratively
  7. Communicate continuously and clearly
  8. Demonstrate control

Bertrand Meyer

Bertrand Meyer in Agile!: The Good, the Hype and the Ugly (Springer, 2014) argues for the following principles that promote agility:

  1. Put the customer at the centre
  2. Let the team self-organise
  3. Work at a sustainable pace
  4. Develop miniminal software i. Produce minimal functionality ii. Produce only the code requested iii. Develop only code and tests
  5. Accept change
  6. Develop iteratively i. Produce frequent working interactions ii. Freeze requirements during iterations
  7. Treat tests as a key resource i. Do not start any new development until all tests are passed. ii. Test first
  8. Express requirements through scenarios

Back to basics

Dave Thomas finishes his blog post by showing us how to do something in an agile fashion:

  1. Find out where you are.
  2. Take a small step towards your goal.
  3. Adjust your understanding based on what you learned.
  4. Repeat.

And “when faced with two or more alternatives that deliver roughly the same value, take the path that makes future change easier.”

That’s it.

Orientate, plan, do, check, adjust, repeat.

Where do we need to focus?

I’ve often found these lists of principles useful to focus the mind on what’s important about working with agility.

Which principles stand out as those we need to focus on

  • as a company?
  • as a team?
  • as an individual?

What is the next small step we need to take?

Originally posted on Vision internal blog.