Transfer saved LEGO games to another PC

LEGO Something
LEGO… something for Windows

In a few weeks time I’ll be migrating my data to a new PC and since my two older boys, twins Reuben and Joshua, love playing

  • LEGO Star Wars I & II: The Complete Saga
  • LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars
  • LEGO The Lord of the Rings

I was keen to make sure I knew how to reliably transfer their current saved games to the new computer when it arrived.

Current v future setups

My current PC setup sees me dual booting between Windows 8 Professional 64-bit (on C:) and Windows 7 Professional 32-bit (on D:).

The first partition is my main day-to-day setup for web development, email, writing, image editing, sound recording, etc. The second is simply known as “the games computer”: it has a very clean installation of Windows 7 with only the essential drivers installed plus a few games.

I’ve yet to decide exactly how to configure my new PC, but I expect that I’ll drop the dual boot and simply run everything under Windows 8 Pro 64-bit.

So over the last couple of days I’ve installed these three favourite games of the boys and trialled copying the saved games over. And I’m delighted to report that it worked.

Process

What I did was:

  1. Back-up the files (as detailed below) on my Windows 7 installation.
  2. Install each game on my Windows 8 installation.
  3. Run the game, so that it could create new save locations.
  4. Back-up the default save location files.
  5. Overwrite the Windows 8 save location files with the ones I’d backed-up from Windows 7.

And it worked!

LEGO Star Wars I & II: The Complete Saga

Here is the directory that I found all the files that I needed to copy, where {USER} is the name of your Windows Vista, 7 or 8 account:

C:\Users\{USER}\AppData\Local\Lucasarts\LEGO Star Wars - The Complete Saga\

It contained the following directory and files, as we had used only one save slot:

  • \SavedGames
    • \SaveGame0.LEGO Star Wars - The Complete Saga_SavedGame
  • \Mappings.dat
  • \pcconfig.txt

As far as I can tell the SaveGame0.LEGO Star Wars - The Complete Saga_SavedGame file stores the actual game progress: characters unlocked, canisters found, bonus levels accessed, etc; Mappings.dat stores any customisations made to keyboard and gamepad controls; and pcconfig.txt stores information such as screen resolution, graphics and sound customisations.

LEGO Star Wars III: The Clone Wars

Saved files for this game can be found in

C:\Users\{USER}\AppData\Roaming\LucasArts\LEGOStarWarsIII\

It contained the following directory and files again we had used only one save slot:

  • \CachedShaders
    • (1,100 files with hex address filenames, e.g. 0x00ae4b5d.shader)
  • \SavedGames
    • \Slot1
      • \GAME1.LEGOStarWarsIIISaveGameData
  • \Mappings.dat
  • \pcconfig.txt

I didn’t copy over the CachedShaders files, but I let the game build the cache again afresh. The other two files were the same as above: games controls plus video and sound configurations.

LEGO The Lord of the Rings

Lastly, I copied over our progress in the Lord of the Rings by access these files:

C:\Users\Games\AppData\Roaming\Warner Bros. Interactive Entertainment\LEGO The Lord of the Rings\

which consisted of these files:

  • \CachedShaders
    • (278 files with hex address filenames plus .shader, .pcode and .vcode suffixes)
  • \SavedGames
    • \Slot1
      • \game1.legothelordoftheringssavegamedata
    • \Slot4
      • game1.legothelordoftheringssavegamedata
  • \Mappings.dat
  • \pcconfig.txt

Again, I didn’t copy over the CachedShaders files, but I let the game build the cache again afresh. The other two files were the same as above: games controls plus video and sound configurations.

Waxman chess engine with WinBoard

winboard

Many years ago, in the days of Windows 3.1 and just as Windows 95 was coming onto the market, I bought a copy of a computer magazine, I seem to remember that it was PCW (RIP), that had a 1.44” floppy disk on the front and on that disk was a chess program called Waxman by Ivan Bacigal.

The name comes from the fact that ‘Waxman’ looks a bit like the Russian word for chess: WAXMATbI.

I got an email from someone this week asking me if I knew how to get it running on Windows 7 Home Premium (64-bit). I had to email back to say that unfortunately Waxman was a 16-bit application and 64-bit versions of Windows can’t run them.

WinBoard

However, this evening I discovered that Waxman is still going albeit in a slightly different way: as a game engine for WinBoard. It’s pretty simple to setup too:

  1. Download WinBoard
    Unzip it into a directory, e.g. c:\winboard
  2. Edit the winboard.ini file in Notepad adding two lines beneath the firstChessProgramNames and secondChessProgramNames lines, i.e. /firstChessProgramNames={“waxman xboard -h32 -r-900” […] /secondChessProgramNames={“waxman xboard -h32 -r-900”
  3. Download Waxman 2010
  4. Unzip the file into the c:\winboard directory
  5. Run the winboard.exe file.
  6. Select the Waxman engine from the drop-down options
  7. Click OK.

What’s nice is that you can setup a position; a feature that is surprisingly absent from a number of versions of chess for Windows; including the built-into-Windows 7 ChessTitans.

Decoding driver versions

I’ve never had a great deal of success with my PCs at work. I’m currently on my 5th machine and even this one isn’t behaving itself.

Graphics cards issues

The issue appears to be to do with my graphics cards.  I have two running under Windows 7 Professional (64-bit):

  • NVIDIA Quadro FX 1400
  • NVIDIA Quadro NVS 285

And every couple of days when I boot up my PC at the start of the day I get a Blue Screen of Death complaining that there is an issue with my graphics card.

Of course, it took Windows 7 about 6 months of doing this before it gave me a clue that it was related to my graphics card.

So this morning I took the plunge and upgraded my graphics card drivers. After the post-install reboot everything appears to be OK; even the NVIDIA Control Panel is working again, which is good.

Versions

But the thing that often confuses me is the numbering system of a lot of hardware drivers.

For example, today I downloaded “Quadro driver release 265”, which also describes itself as “version 267.17” but once installed Windows reports that version “8.17.12.6717” has been installed.

Which is a bit like running the installer for version “banana” and then discovering that version “coconut-chipshop-apple-hamster” has been successfully installed.

Why do hardware manufacturers do this? Aren’t computers complicated enough? All I wanted to do was to make sure that the drivers had updated successfully.

It took a minute or two of staring at the two groups of numbers and a little Googling to discover this:

  • Installer version 267.17
  • Installed version: 8.17.12.6717

There are the installer version numbers at the end of the installed version numbers.

How obvious!

Dates

At least the dates should be the same, shouldn’t they?

  • Installer release date: 02 March 2011
  • Installed driver date: 17 February 2011
  • Release notes date: 22 February 2011

Maybe I should just go back to using my Psion 5mx for everything.