My paperless(-ish) office with OneNote and NAPS2

Screenshot of NAPS2 application. Two documents have been scanned and are shown side-by-side.
Screenshot of NAPS2, the scan to PDF application I use alongside OneNote

I’ve started using NAPS2 to convert paper documents to PDF to store in Dropbox or Microsoft OneNote as part of my paperless(-ish) office approach to productivity.

Predictions about the paperless office have been circulating for over 40 years now. And yet here I am in 2018 sitting next to a four-drawer filing cabinet containing letters and documents about everything from my house rental and utility bills to health records, university qualifications, and work-related documents.

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The importance of failure (and of praising effort not intelligence)

Neon sign reads: People fail forward to success by Ian Kim on Unsplash
Photo by Ian Kim on Unsplash

I’m finally learning Russian (again)

I am currently learning Russian and reminding myself of the integral importance that failure has in the learning process.

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Using a 4K ultra HD TV as a PC monitor

LG 43UK6950 PLB (4K Ultra HD TV)

Over the last couple of months I’ve been considering buying a TV to also use as a PC monitor. I’ve been surprised to find relatively very little information online about it so here’s what I’ve discovered and my experiences so far.

My experience has been great, so far.

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Mum and dad on Highway

A couple of weeks ago I sent a bunch of video cassettes to Digital Converters to be converted to a digital format that I could view and edit on my PC.

Among the cassettes was one featuring this episode of Highway featuring my mum and dad.

Highway, presented by Sir Harry Secombe, was a British TV series that was broadcast between 1983 and 1993 and produced by Tyne Tees Television in Newcastle upon Tyne. It was a religious broadcast that featured religious songs, readings and interviews with people about their faith, lifestyle and how they feel God has been at work in their lives.

I can’t remember when this was broadcast—1988 or 1989 maybe? (I’ll have to ask Mum.) After his haemorrhages he had a portion of his skull removed as it had become badly infected and a couple of years later was replaced with a plastic plate wired in with titanium. After removing the portion of skull, it left an indentation that was large enough for Dad to fit his whole fist into. This broadcast was clearly after the restorative surgery, but you can still clearly see the scar down the middle of his forehead.

During the interview with Sir Harry, Dad spoke about how he encountered God after having a triple subarachnoid brain haemorrhage in early 1983. You hear how his voice still stumbles over some words in the video.

This is one of only three recordings that I have of my dad who died in January 1998.

A visual history of European borders

I’ve come across this video a number of times, the latest was this morning in an article shared by LinkedIn.

The video shows the borders and populations of each country in Europe for every year between 400 BCE and 2017 CE.

This is one of the things that I think about whenever I hear people arguing about the ‘problems of immigration’. Immigration, my dictionary tells me, is “the action of coming to live permanently in a foreign country.” And a ‘foreign country’ is simply one that is not my own.

But look at this map—look at the boundaries, look how fluid they are. Look how completely and utterly man-made (and it was mostly men) most of these are. Some are dictated by coastlines but the majority are, I’m sure, dictated by ambition and greed.

I think it would do Europe a world of good right now if every citizen had to have their DNA analysed to show us where we have come from. It would show that we are all more connected than we think, and as such we need one another.