Fathers. Brothers, and Sons

Frank Bello’s autobiography

As I said in a previous post, I have been trying to read more this year. Less ‘doom-scrolling’ through infinite social media feeds, more feeding my mind with other people’s insights and experiences.

I recently finished reading Frank Bello’s autobiography Fathers, Brothers, and Sons: Surving anguish, abandonment, and Anthrax, co-written by Joel McIver and with a foreword by Gene Simmons of Kiss.

Continue reading Fathers. Brothers, and Sons

The Fear Bubble

The Fear Bubble: Harness Fear and Live Without Limits eBook : Middleton,  Ant: Amazon.co.uk: Kindle Store
The Fear Bubble

Over the last few years I have read mostly business, productivity and agile-related books that have helped me at work. This year, I have made it a priority to try to read more and to read more widely, from a variety of genres.

Last night I finished reading The Fear Bubble by former Special Boat Service (SBS) operator Ant Middleton.

Continue reading The Fear Bubble

Make Time

Make Time: How to focus on what matters every day

Although I now subscribe to the 12 Week Year approach to planning , one of my overall goals for 2020 is to read more.

I’ve got the year off to a good start reading Make Time: How to focus on what matters every day by Jake Knapp and John Zeratsky, the team behind the popular Sprint: How to Solve Big Problems and Test New Ideas in Just Five Days.

Continue reading Make Time

Things we know but don’t know we know

I came across this ages ago and it’s stuck with me ever since. Apart from the actually remembering the order of the words bit.

Which is kind of important. But I guess I could work it out because, after all, it’s something we know but don’t know we know until we do it.

It’s from this passage from The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase by Mark Forsyth about how to order adjectives:

Adjectives in English absolutely have to be in this order: opinion-size-age-shape-colour-origin-material-purpose Noun. So you can have a lovely little old rectangular green French silver whittling knife. But if you mess with that word order in the slightest you’ll sound like a maniac. It’s an odd thing that every English speaker uses that list, but almost none of us could write it out.

Look! I’ve written it out.

Oh, alright, I’ve copied and pasted it. I’m going to write it out now:

  1. Opinion
  2. Size
  3. Age
  4. Shape
  5. Colour
  6. Origin
  7. Material
  8. Purpose
  9. Noun

Or OSASCOMPN for short.