Organising tabs by groups in Google Chrome

Four tab groups in Google Chrome

Generally, I am a bit of a tab minimalist when it comes to my browsing habits—I don’t often have more than about five or six tabs open at a time.

At work, however, I am working with two teams (Kronos and Odin) and I was recently looking for a method to neatly group tabs relating to the two teams plus my general work stuff (email, HR system, Jira, Trello, etc.) and personal productivity applications (calendar, email, contacts, task list, etc.)

As I switch between teams quite regularly, I was finding myself taking a little too long to search my various tabs for the right one. Enter Google Chrome’s built-in tab groups. Now everything is much easier to find.

Chrome tab groups

As far as I am aware, Chrome tabs groups rolled out to all users back in May last year.

It is simple to create a new tab group. Right-click the tab you wish to add to a new group (or to an existing group), select “Add tab to group” and then select “New group” or click on an existing group.

You can customise the name and colour of each tab group; eight colours are available.

There is also an experimental option that allows a tab group to be collapsible and expandable, if tab groups are enabled. You can enable this by visiting chrome://flags in your browser and searching for “tab group” then enabling the “Tab Groups Collapse” option. Restart your browser and ta-da!

Enhancements wishlist

What I would find very useful is the ability to save a particular group of tabs that I could open immediately. So, I could have a “Productivity” tab group that immediately opens my calendar, email, tasks and contacts.

Google, please make that happen!

Published by

Gareth Saunders

I’m Gareth J M Saunders, 49 years old, 6′ 4″, father of 3 boys (including twins). Enneagram type FOUR and introvert (INFP), I am a non-stipendiary priest in the Scottish Episcopal Church, I sing with the NYCGB alumni choir, play guitar, play mahjong, write, draw and laugh… Scrum master at Vision Ltd, Dundee. Latterly, web architect and agile project manager at the University of St Andrews and former warden at Agnes Blackadder Hall.

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