Getting my Logitech F710 wireless gamepad to work with Windows 10 (and 10.1)

Logitech F710 wireless gamepad
Logitech F710 wireless gamepad

UPDATE: I’ve updated this post a little to also include information about getting this to work in Windows 10.1.


Last night I took the plunge and upgraded my desktop PC from Windows 8.1 Pro (64-bit) to Windows 10 Pro (64-bit).

The whole process took less than an hour, and as far as I could see most of my peripherals were still working after the upgrade: laser printer, scanner, webcam.

Of course, the one thing that I forgot to test were my pair of Logitech F710 wireless gamepads, which my three boys use most to play LEGO games. The controllers couldn’t be detected.

I downloaded the latest drivers from the Logitech website, which they claimed were Windows 10-compatible. That didn’t work.

There are instructions below for both Windows 10 and Windows 10.1.

F710 not working Windows 10

Here’s what I did to get them to work; I found the official Logitech forum to be very useful when I originally encountered this issue with Windows 10.

  1. Remove both nano receivers from the PC (I have mine marked 1 and 2, so I know to which gamepad they belong).
  2. Switch the gamepad to D mode.
  3. Insert the nano receiver.
  4. Windows 10 installs drivers for Rumblepad 2.
  5. Remove the nano receiver.
  6. Switch the gamepad to X mode.
  7. Insert the nano receiver.
  8. Windows 10 installs drivers for Wireless Gamepad F710.
  9. Press Windows key + Pause/Break to open System screen.
  10. Click Device Manager.
  11. Locate Wireless Gamepad F710.
  12. Right-click and select “Update Driver Software”.
  13. Click “Browse my computer for driver software”.
  14. Click “Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer”.
  15. Select Xbox 360 Peripherals.
  16. Select Xbox 360 Controller for Windows.
  17. Click Next.
  18. On the Update Driver Warning dialog, click Yes.
  19. Allow the driver to install. You should now see Xbox 360 Controller for Windows listed.
  20. (Optional: if you have more than one controller, keep the working one plugged in but now do the same, starting at step #1, for the other controller.)
Device Manager listing the Xbox 360 Controller for Windows
Device Manager listing the Xbox 360 Controller for Windows

The controller now works perfectly for me in the LEGO games. Obviously, I’ll report back if there are any further issues.

F710 not working on Windows 10.1

I also found this post, “Logitech Wireless Gamepad F710 Not Working with Windows 10“, on Superuser to be useful when trying to get this working on Windows 10.1. Their advice was as follows.

Make sure your controller is turned off and the wireless receiver is plugged-in to your PC before proceeding with the steps below:

  1. Press Windows key+X (or right-click the start menu icon).
  2. Click “Device Manager”.
  3. Find any listings of “Unknown Device” in the list of devices, likely under Human Interface Devices or Other Devices, or devices that have a yellow “!” warning icon on them.
  4. Right-click each unknown device device and select “Scan for hardware changes” and then “Update Driver Software” > “Search Automatically for Updated Driver” options before the next steps, especially if you have more than one “Unknown Device” listed.
  5. Right-click on “Unknown Device” and click “Update Driver Software”.
  6. Click the option “Browse my computer for driver software”.
  7. Click the option “Let me pick from a list of device drivers on my computer”.
  8. Near the bottom of the list, select the option that looks something like “Xbox 360 Peripherals” and click “Next”.
  9. From the list, select the driver option “Xbox 360 Wireless Receiver for Windows” and click “Next”.
  10. A warning will appear about the possibility of the device or your computer not working properly and likelihood of system instability. Disregard it and click “Yes” in the bottom right corner of the panel.
  11. A message should appear within a few seconds saying that the device has been correctly installed. Click “Ok” and exit out of all device manager windows.
  12. After performing these steps, power on your controller if it is not already powered on.
  13. Then press Win + R to bring up the run dialog and type in joy.cpl and click OK.
  14. This brings up the Game Controllers control panel applet. You can use this to check whether the game controllers have been identified, and if you select the game controller and click “Properties” you can test it: it will demonstrate which joysticks and buttons are being pressed.

Good luck!

Getting fit again (and hey! so far I’ve lost 6 kg)

Six bags of sugar. This is how much weight I've lost in the last five months
This is how much weight I’ve lost in the last five months

On Friday afternoon I attended my bi-annual renal outpatients’ clinic at Ninewells hospital in Dundee. My appointments usually follow the same script.

Doctor: Hello, come in, sit down… how are you?

Me: Fine, thanks.

Doctor: Good. How have your kidneys been over the last six months? Any problems?

Me: Fine, no problems.

Doctor: Your blood pressure is a bit high, but you’ve probably been rushing to get here. Let’s take it again… Hmm… still a bit high. You’ve put on more weight, I see. You really need to lose weight. That will help with your blood pressure.

And off I’m sent with a slap on the wrist, a ticket to get my bloods taken, and an appointment for six months’ time.

Change of script

Well, dear reader, not this time. This time we had a change of script. I was in and out in about five minutes. No reprimand, my blood pressure was looking good, just a a request for bloods and to return in not six but nine months’ time (always a good sign when they don’t want to see you quite as soon).

The reason: over the last five months I have been exercising. A lot. And yesterday afternoon I discovered just now much weight I’ve lost: 6 kilogrammes (13.2 lbs).

I knew it must have been quite a bit: I am now back into my XXL t-shirts, and my 38″ jeans.

The last seven years have been in many ways the most brutal, the more difficult that I’ve ever experienced:

  • sleep deprivation (twins and then singleton) for about four or five years
  • two back injuries
  • two neck injuries
  • viral meningitis

Whenever I did exercise (walking, cycling or light dumbbell weights) invariably I’d get ill pretty quickly, within a few days I’d come down with someone, or I’d overdo it and pick up an injury.

And with a regular pattern like that comes fear. And so I ended up avoiding exercise because I didn’t want to get ill.

In June of this year I knew that something had to change. I was experiencing major headaches again, comparable with the ones I had experienced during last year’s meningitis. I knew that I’d put on more weight, I was already in XXXL t-shirts and these were beginning to feel a little tight. I was feeling so unfit and so ashamed of my size that I knew that I had to do something about it. It actually got so bad that I felt I couldn’t even look at myself in the mirror.

I knew that I could do it, I’d done it before, after I’d moved from Edinburgh to Fife. I just wished that I had written down what I’d done so that I could do it again.

So I committed to the following:

  • Eat less (especially, cut out unnecessary  sugars and sweets).
  • Cycle more.
  • Lift weights more.

With the exercise I committed myself to a little, often. And with that I got on my bike and tackled a familiar circuit that I used to do: home to Kilrenny, up the farm track to the main road, then back home. I knew that it would take me about 13 minutes to reach the top of the farm track, up a gently hill, and about 26 minutes to complete the loop and get back home.

A few weeks in, I started lifting weights again. A little and often. Squats, preacher curls, bench presses. I hit major muscle groups. I followed a couple of Men’s Health dumbbell guides that I’d collected over the years.

Then I went back out on my bike, and was amazed that I could go significantly faster. The weight lifting had given my legs strength. Who knew?!

Night rider

The clocks changed and I continued to go out in the dark. I have fabulously powerful LED bike lights that illuminate the road ahead. And that’s when I realised that one of my biggest enemies, one of the things that had been holding me back, was myself.

When I cycle during the day and hit the bottom of a climb there is a small, nagging voice in the back of my mind that says, “You’ll never make that climb!” And coupled with the fear of getting ill, or pulling an injury, my brain gives in and replies, “Yeah… you’re probably right”, and I slow down and don’t push myself quite as much.

But at night… at night I can’t see the top of the hill. And so I don’t hear the nagging voices. I’m in the moment, and I just keep going, until I find the top of the hill.

So, I set myself a goal: get from my house to the top of the hill in under 10 minutes. A week in to my challenge I got it down to 10′ 52″.

I then realised that I was taking it too easy getting from my home to the bottom of the hill, so a couple of weeks ago I set out with the attitude of going for broke.

I pushed myself harder than I had in a long time, through the pain, up the hill, pulling on my pedals when pushing hurt too much, pushing when that started to ache.

At the top of the hill I slumped over the handlebars, out of breath, my heartbeat in my ears, sweat turning to steam in the cool night air.

I unclipped my bike computer and held it in front of my front light. Five minutes fifty-six seconds. What?! 5′ 56″.

Well… that’s under 10 minutes.

Onwards…

The next year or two are going to contain a lot of changes, big and small. Some I will have little control over, others I will grasp with two hands. This is one of them. I’m getting back on track (metaphorically and literally), getting fit and regaining my confidence.

Yesterday’s renal appointment was a significant milestone. Let’s see just how much fitter I can be in nine months’ time when I present myself to the clinic once again.

I’ll be there for you

I’ve had this rather amazing song going around my head today.

I heard the voice of redemption
For me there is no exemption
I started praying

I heard the voice of satisfaction
Needing me for benefaction
I started pleading

I heard the bells begin to chime
Warning me, oh Lord!
Don’t let this be my time
Don’t let this be my time

I’ll be there for you, when you walk through the fire
I’ll be there for you, when the flames get higher
When nothing fits and nothing seems right
Till the very last breath of my life, I’ll be there for you

You saw me slide, you saw me fall
We kept our pride through it all
We started screaming

When skies are dark, no sun shines through
I know I see the light in you
We stopped dreaming and started believing

I’ll be there for you, when you walk through the fire
I’ll be there for you, when the flames get higher
When nothing fits and nothing seems right
Till the very last breath of my life, I’ll be there for you
I’ll be there

In my hour of need
You were there always
Now it’s time for me to be there for you too
Always

I’ll be there for you