Signed off

Statement of fitness for work: You are not fit for work
Statement of fitness for work

A few months back I promised that I would write more honest blog posts this year. Last month I blogged elsewhere about mental health in web development. How about a blog post today that combines the two, in a spirit of transparency?

This morning I made a same-day appointment to see my GP as I’d had a sore mouth for a couple of weeks and it didn’t seem to be getting any better. I expected him to take a quick look, make a diagnosis, and send me packing with either a prescription or a handful of advice. Instead he signed me off for a week. (And gave me a prescription.)

I’ve only just read what he wrote: “stress related illness”. That about sums it up.

It turns out that your oral health offers clues about your overall health. And my mouth told my doctor that my general health was terrible and that I needed to be signed off. And when I say “my mouth told my doctor” I don’t mean the speaky bit of my mouth.

What has brought me here is a combination of

  • being hugely understaffed at work (two vacancies, two off on long-term sick, one secondment; leaving our potential team of seven as a team of two);
  • not having had a proper break (being off sick with a bad cold or a chest infection doesn’t constitute a proper break, does it?) since mid-October 2013;
  • the usual night-time interruptions related to having small children;
  • general (and specific!) family stresses and strains;
  • other (probably)

It all came to a focus this morning in that doctor’s surgery. And I cried.

I resisted his suggestion of time off, of course. I tried to negotiate a week’s grace to see if I needed to be signed off next week instead, as I didn’t want to let the team down. And when I say ‘team’ I am now, of course, referring to one person (!?)

I do feel bad about it. I have colleagues who have said during the last few months, “I don’t know how you keep going?” Today I acknowledged that I can’t just keep going. It also highlights very much, I hope, that our current way of working within the University web team just isn’t sustainable.

Something had to give and thankfully it was my physical health first rather than my mental health. But as the GP said it would only be a matter of time if I didn’t stop now. Without exactly saying “a stitch in time saves nine”, my GP responded by saying something along the lines of “a week off in time saves nine”.

In the end, after a thorough examination, bloods eventually coaxed from my veins, and the promise of some ‘tasty’ liquorice-flavoured medicine, I relented and agreed to a week.

Believe me, the irony is not lost on me: weeks of trying to unsuccessfully negotiate time off at work and when the GP offers it immediately and for (please choose) one or two weeks, I hesitate.

So… doctors orders are to rest. I took him at his word, returned home, made a couple of calls, had a spot of lunch and then slept until 3:00pm.

Here’s to a few days of healing.

5 thoughts on “Signed off”

  1. Dude, been there, wore out that particular t-shirt. If you ever fancy tea and sympathy from someone who understands, give me a shout. I’m still here, just not there.

  2. Poor You! I too have been in the same boat over the last year or so with work/life stress manifesting as a recurring chest infection. I foolishly ignored the doctors on several occasions when they offered to sign me off but I finally saw some sense and, even if you cannot escape all the sources of stress, respite from work-related stress was enough to help me start to recover.

    Remember, though, that work related stress includes worrying about what’s going on at work when you’re not there. So do something that you find both enjoyable and distracting during your convalescence and remind yourself, when you have to, that you are not responsible for the mess at work.

    Take it as easy as you can and Get Well Soon!

  3. So sorry to hear this. If you need to talk to anyone at work, and not necessarily HR, feel free to drop me a line. I have been helping a few people in units who are under stress and can recommend a local therapist. I would also like to know what/ how we can change things to make life easier for those in non management, as well as management, positions. Unions can help, but I think an open discussion with all other staff is needed to try to sort out the problems – or openly note them at least.
    Rest and Relax!

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