Wunderlist — UI peculiarities

Wunderlist—a beautiful and simple to-do list
Wunderlist—a beautiful and simple to-do list

As part of a money-saving exercise, at the moment I’m looking to move away from using a hosted Microsoft Exchange account for my email, calendar, contacts, notes and tasks. I know that I won’t get one application that will cover all five elements, but I’m okay with that.

My two main criteria are that the applications I choose should be:

  • Free
  • Able to synchronize between PC, Android and the web

For tasks I’m now beginning to trial the free version of Wunderlist, a to-do list application for iPhoneiPadAndroidWindowsMac and Web. It’s really rather good.

Being involved in web design professionally, and often called on to assist with web application user-interface (UI) designs I frequently find myself analysing other people’s application interfaces and asking myself why certain elements have been laid out in a particular way.

I found myself considering these things when using Wunderlist for the PC this morning. I wanted to change where new list items were added, from the bottom of the list to the top.

Curiously, on the application menu I selected “Preferences” (4th item down):

wunderlist-preferences

But it opened a dialog window called “Settings”. Why not keep the two terms consistent?

Wunderlist settings: add new items
Wunderlist settings: add new items

On the first panel, which is open by default, I found the option I wanted: where to add new items. However, I was a little surprised by the order.

Why is “Bottom of List” at the top of that two option list, and “Top of List” at the bottom?

I would have thought it would be more intuitive to users—in a Steve Krug ‘don’t make the think’ kind of way—to list them in the order that the words themselves suggest:

  • Top of list
  • Bottom of list

What do you think?

Published by

Gareth Saunders

I’m Gareth J M Saunders, 47 years old, 6′ 4″, father of 3 boys (including twins). Scrum master at Vision Ltd, Dundee. Latterly, web architect and agile project manager at the University of St Andrews and former warden at Agnes Blackadder Hall. Enneagram type FOUR and introvert, I am a non-stipendiary priest in the Scottish Episcopal Church, I sing with the NYCGB alumni choir, play guitar, write, draw and laugh… a lot.

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