Mobile attitudes–how many apps do you have installed?

20110928-htc-hd2

In this month’s .net magazine there is an interesting article about Mobile attitudes that focuses on who is accessing the Web via mobile devices and why.

Based on research by MRM London, they group mobile Web users into one of four camps:

  1. Rookie – tend to be older, watch less TV, listen to less radio and surf the Web less than others. They tend to have around 9 apps installed on their smartphone, if they indeed have a smartphone.
  2. Rationalist – generally between 25-45, they are happy to use the Web on their mobile device but are very selective about what they access. They have a general lack of understanding about what extra value their mobile access can offer them.
  3. Everyday – mostly under 35, these are heavy mobile Web users who understand the value that mobile Web offers, but they would generally prefer to be sat in front of their desktop PC/Mac or laptop.
  4. Restless – for this demographic, mostly under 34, the mobile Web is an integral part of their everyday life. They understand what value mobile usage brings, and they consume a lot of media, not just online but TV, radio, magazines, etc.

Western

Something that struck me about the article was how Western these categories are. I wonder what differences there would be if this study was extended worldwide. How about mobile users in Africa or China or India, for example?

Mobile Web is just going to get bigger, user base will be larger and more and more developers will need to think about their mobile strategy more than they do now.

How many apps do you have installed?

The article talked about the number of apps that users tend to have installed. I guess the implication was that the more confident the mobile user about what they do online the more applications they would have installed.

I suspect (I hope) that HTML5 will change all of that as more mobile browsers become more capable of running complex Web apps that these app downloads will move to becoming simply website/web app URL bookmarks.

Anyway, it reckoned that the average user has 20 apps installed, of which they use less than half; rookies have only 9 installed, and those labelled restless have 42.

I’ve recently spent a lot of time on my mobile phone (stuck in bed for days after damaging my back, other blog post soon), and have just uninstalled the apps that I don’t use in order to free up memory and speed up my HTC HD2 running Windows Mobile 6.5.

What I have installed

Here’s what I now have installed (in not particular order), which are the apps that I actually use. This doesn’t include default apps that came bundled with the HTC HD2.

  1. Opera Mobile 10
  2. Spb Mobile Shell 3.5 (replacement user-interface)
  3. Spb Wallet (password safe)
  4. BBC News
  5. Nitrogen (MP3 player)
  6. SimpleAct QuickMark (QR code scanner)
  7. Mobipocket Reader (eBook reader for .mobi format)
  8. CoPilot Live 8 (GPS)
  9. Leaf GPS Dashboard (GPS toolkit)
  10. Panoramic moTweets (Twitter client)
  11. Microsoft Office Mobile 2010
  12. JAM Software TreeSize Mobile
  13. MSN Weather
  14. Gmail (Java app)
  15. SKTools (Registry editor, free-up RAM, temp file cleaner tools, etc.)

How many apps do you have installed on your smartphone? Do you use them all?

Collage from the Potting Shed–My Web

de9860080c5a

According to Mozilla the above collage represents my Web.

What does it all mean?!

Here’s what the objects are supposed to represent:

  1. Car Magazine—You are the Gear Head — mark of those who know their limited-slip differential from their throttle body. You get all revved up at the sound of a big V8, and the smell of burning rubber brings a wistful tear to your eye.
  2. Puppet—Everything’s better with a monkey in it. Monkeys are fun, smart, and optimistic. You got this crafty monkey because it reflects your own delightful optimism and playfulness. Or maybe you like bananas?
  3. Crayons—The symbol of unpretentious creativity and art. You are almost certainly imbued with a child-like curiosity and an unfettered imagination, enjoy self expression and bright colours. You are child-like, or may actually be a child.
  4. Statue of Liberty—Quick: look out your window. Any purple mountains’ majesty? Amber waves of grain? We wouldn’t be surprised, because you’re in the U-S-A! [Erm… I’m not, I’m in S-C-O-T-L-A-N-D!]
  5. Comb—You’ve earned The Comb! A mark of neatness that exemplifies your dedication to presenting a pleasing visage to the world. You’ve got style, and substance too.
  6. Friendship Pin—The Friendship Pin — an unbreakable bond between you and your BFF. It shows you are loyal, willing to wear your love on your sleeve (or sneaker).
  7. Friendship Bracelet—Your buddies will be overjoyed to learn that you’ve drawn the Friendship Bracelet. It stands for sociability and your talent for making each friend, online and off, feel special. So very special.
  8. USB Drive—Technology lives to serve, and you like your information portable, pocketable and sharable. That’s how data becomes action, and gadgets become essential.
  9. Name Tag—Who are you, really? That’s something you can decide, and decide again, and again. Create a persona for each world you live in. Just don’t get confused, or they’ll make a movie about you.
  10. Wrench—Wield the tools to make it yours, for you are unique — and your browser can reflect that.
  11. Mystic Crystals—When was the last time you aligned your chakras? You’re supposed to do it every 3,000 miles.
  12. Rocket—Eat my dust! I’m bumping up my browsing into hyperdrive and leaving lesser browsers behind..
  13. Disguise Mask—Internet Ninja! You leave no trace of your travels, online or off.
  14. Android Smartphone—For you, the Internet cannot be contained to a desk or a cafe. You carry it with you, not a place you go, but a tool you use. This is your Swiss Army Knife™.

Amplifier and Progstreaming

20110912-progstreaming

One of my favourite live bands, Amplifier, are touring in December and are making it as far north as Glasgow—it would be great to see them again.

You can check out Amplifier on Spotify, or for the next couple of months or so you can stream their latest album The Octopus and Fractal EP on Progstreaming, a website from The Netherlands that offers free streaming of the latest progressive rock records for “a maximum of two months”. They currently have 97 albums to choose from.

This evening I’ve listened to Transitions by Mandrake Project and Communication Lost by Wolverine. Both really enjoyable albums. On the back of that I’m definitely going to check out more of Mandrake Project.

I love listening to new music.

Isaac’s baptism cake

20110908-isaacsbaptismcake

On Sunday morning we set off at 07:35 for Selkirk in the Scottish Borders—where I grew up, and where my Mum and sister still live—to celebrate Isaac’s baptism.

We chose Selkirk because my sister is really unwell and is unable to travel long distances, and so wanting her to be a part of it we travelled to her, to the church of St John the Evangelist where I had been baptised around 14,450 days earlier.

After the baptism the cake appeared: a magnificent Noah’s Ark cake <whisper>from Marks & Spencer</whisper>.

Reuben, Joshua and Isaac were absolute stars the whole day, I was so proud of them all.

A lovely day with friends and family, and many prayers of thanks to God.

Changing the look of the Windows 7 taskbar

By default the Windows 7 taskbar combines all open applications within its taskbar icon, like this:

20110908-windows7taskbardefault

The only way to tell whether an application is open or not is to notice that its icon is subtly highlighted.

Icons and titles

A few weeks ago, however, I stumbled upon a setting in Windows 7’s Taskbar and Start Menu Properties dialog that did this to my taskbar:

Windows 7 taskbar

The open applications have now expanded and include something of its title. And I have to say that I rather like it. In my opinion it combines the best of both the Windows XP taskbar and Windows 7 taskbar.

What to do…

  1. Right-click the Start orb.
  2. Click on Properties.
  3. A dialog window will appear. Click on the Taskbar tab.
  4. The “Taskbar buttons” drop-down has three options. The default is the first one, choose the second or third depending on whether you ever want just the icons.
  1. Always combine, hide labels.
  2. Combine when taskbar is full.
  3. Never combine.
  • Click OK.

And that’s it.