Not in Comic Sans MS you can’t!

20110502-comicsansms

This afternoon yet another pre-Scottish Election leaflet dropped through my letterbox. It was this one (above) from the Scottish National Party entitled Fife Independent with the strap-line “Together we can make Scotland better.”

As I tweeted at the time:

SNP newsletter through the door just now. Strapline says “Together we can make Scotland better”. Not in Comic Sans you can’t! #election

I’m a firm believer that the typeface that you select for a publication helps set the tone of what you have to say.

As Alex W. White says in The Elements of Graphic Design “choosing a typeface that matches the content is important. Words are symbols of emotions and ideas that manipulate the reader” (Ibid. p. 105). He encourages the reader to “listen to type”.

The Ban Comic Sans website says much the same thing:

Like the tone of a spoken voice, the characteristics of a typeface convey meaning. The design of the typeface is, in itself, its voice. Often this voice speaks louder than the text itself. Thus when designing a “Do Not Enter” sign the use of a heavy-stroked, attention-commanding font such as Impact or Arial Black is appropriate. Typesetting such a message in Comic Sans would be ludicrous.

The history of Comic Sans MS is fascinating (if you like that sort of thing) and in many ways it is a very well-designed font, modelled on the typography used in American comic books. But that is the context in which it makes most sense to use Comic Sans MS: comic books not party political newsletters.

Because no matter how good your arguments may be, Scottish National Party, I simply cannot take you seriously if you print it in Comic Sans. That is just down-right lazy.

Day 2: Your least favourite song #30dsc

30 day song challenge day 2: Your least favourite song

Iron Maiden—The Angel and the Gambler

I’m sure there are plenty of songs that I can’t stand, I just can’t remember what they are; which is probably a good thing.

They probably have accordions in them.

With the advent of digital radio, MP3s and online music streaming services like Spotify I now get the chance to listen to what I want pretty much when I want to. I remember the first week that I moved from listening to BBC Radio 1 all the time to a randomized playlist of MP3s on my own PC. About an hour in I remember thinking to myself “Wow! I’ve liked every song they’ve played on this radio station!” And then I remembered…

Anyway, I thought I’d restrict myself to my least favourite song of the songs that I own, or at least something that is representative of it. Sadly, it’s from those stalwarts of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM) Iron Maiden.

The Blaze Bayley-era of Iron Maiden is by far my least favourite. I have nothing against the guy, I just didn’t like his voice, certainly compared with Paul di’Anno and Bruce ‘Human Air Raid Siren’ Dickinson.

Largely because of his voice I just didn’t connect with the songs on the two studio albums Bayley recorded with Maiden: The X Factor (1995) and Virtual XI (1998). Firstly, I just couldn’t hear past the vocals, and secondly, I just found the music to be largely unimaginative and same-y.  Sorry guys!