Learning Subversion

Having effectively moved PCs three times in the last year I’m feeling a little insecure about the safety of my code, so today I’m learning how to use Subversion.

Subversion (SVN) is a version control application that allows me to store my code on a server while working on a local copy. I can then commit any changes made and SVN will keep a track of all the changes I’ve made, so that I can roll-back to an earlier version if need be.

I’m finding the free PDF version of the O’Reilly book Version Control with Subversion very useful. It’s not nearly as complicated as I’d feared it might be.

Maths

Okay, so I want to use the Blueprint CSS framework for a website I’m working on.

Page width is worked out with this formula:

Total width = (number_of_columns * column_width) – margin_width

So, I want a page width as close to 950px as possible, but able to divide equally into 7 sections (for the main navigation). By default there are 24 columns, each 40px wide (including a 10px margin).

The answer — after about an hour of tapping keys on my calculator — is a frustratingly simple 910px.

Or 23 columns.

I should have paid more attention in my Certificate of Sixth Year Studies maths class.

I wish maths classes had been more practical. Sure, I can do differential equations until the cows come home … but I’ve no idea when I would actually need to do them!